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2017 Webinars Series

       
         

Scheduled Webinars

       
       

The Bright Futures 4th Edition:  What's New, and Why
Wednesday, September 13th  12:10 – 1:00PM
The release of the 4th edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision provides primary care clinicians and clinician educators with the opportunity to review what we include in a well visit, to think about how we present it and teach it, and to use evidence for planned changes.  Today we will discuss not just what is new, but how it came to be recommended and how it can be used in your practice.  Following a brief slide presentation, there will be ample opportunity for questions.

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Recorded Webinars

       
       
Early Introduction of Peanuts: What Pediatric Teams Need to Know
Wednesday, September 6th  12:10 – 1:00PM
For over a decade, many pediatricians were following guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics to delay the introduction of highly allergenic foods like peanut in children at risk of developing food allergies.  In early 2015, a landmark study, the LEAP (Learning Early About Peanut) study, demonstrated that prior recommendations may have missed the mark.  Lack and colleagues performed a large prospective study on infants at risk of developing peanut allergy (severe eczema and or egg allergy).  They found that in this high risk group, early introduction of peanut containing food between 4 and 11 months of age, could drop the risk of developing peanut allergy by 80 percent. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has since come out with clinical guidelines to prevent peanut allergy.

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NIAID 2017 Addendum Guidelines for the Prevention of Peanut Allergy in the United States

       
       
Nutritional Supplements: Supplementing Knowledge and Skills
Thursday,  June 29th  12:10 – 1:00PM
Do parents ask/pressure you to prescribe Pediatric nutritional supplements for their toddler’s picky eating? Are you frustrated with attempts to improve variety and nutritional quality of diets of your patients? Does completion of the WIC Medical Documentation Form leave you exasperated? Please join us to learn the answers to these questions and more.  This webinar will review medical rationale for use of nutritional supplements, explore new reformulation of a popular pediatric nutritional supplement and concerns related to these changes, and explore strategies to collaborate with families as well as WIC professionals to improve the variety and balance of children’s diets. Online Registration or Download Registration

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HANDOUTS
Coordinators Listing

       
       
13 Reason’s Why….You Should Screen for Depression in Primary Care
Wednesday, June 21st 12:10 – 1:00PM
The Netflix series “13 Reasons Why” has prompted a national conversation and controversy about how to understand and prevent teen suicide. Professionals have been particularly concerned about the potential for this series to precipitate an increase in teen suicidal thoughts and impulses. In fact, emergency department pediatric psychiatry consultations appear to have spiked following the release of the series. Anecdotally, some of the teens and families have cited “13 Reasons Why” when they present to the ED with suicidal urges. The webinar discusses the importance of screening for and addressing depression and suicidal thoughts and risk with patients. It highlights the positive and negative aspects of the “13 Reasons Why” series and provides talking points to educate patients and families about the series and about teen depression and suicide. 

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HANDOUTS
13RW-Talking-Points
ACCESS MH Suicide Prevention resources
CRAFFT

PHQ-9
phqscreenersPHQ-9.pdf
brightfuturesPHQ-9.pdf

PSC-17
prohealthmdPSC-17.pdf
brightfuturesPSC-17.pdf

       
       
Tying It All Together: Practical Guidelines for Medical Professionals Who Interact with Families and Individuals Affected by Autism
Wednesday, May 31st 12:10 – 1:00PM (PART 6 of 6 part series)  
This webinar with provide a family- and person-centered context for applying information from the first five webinars in this series when interacting with families and individuals affected by autism.  Recent neurophysiological research will be used to create a framework of building positive doctor-family-patient relations by focusing on valued life outcomes and individualized strategies for achieving them, with or without support, from the age of diagnosis through adulthood.  The concept of “support” will also be explored in terms of the neurodiversity movement, advances in assistive technology, and learning difficulties common to individuals with ASD such as difficulty generalizing, discriminating relevant stimuli, and overcoming/developing compensatory strategies due to “hard-wired” barriers to neurotypical functioning over time.

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You Are The Key: Getting into the Routine of Recommending Cancer Prevention in Connecticut
Thursday, May 18th - 12:10 to 1:00PM
Vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) are safe, effective, and have been recommended in the United States since 2006 but coverage remains unacceptably low. Lack of protection provided by vaccination leaves adolescents vulnerable to six types of cancer later in life. In this presentation, we will discuss the challenges that clinicians may face in providing effective recommendations for vaccination, and we will provide information and strategies to overcome these barriers. We will also present information about the current status of coverage in Connecticut, and local barriers that have been identified. Register Online or Download Registration

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Transition from Pediatric to Adult Health Care – Challenges for Youth with Autism
Wednesday, April 5th - 12:10 to 1:00PM (PART 5 of 6 part series)  
Recent estimates of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is 1 in 68 US children and annually, approximately 66,000 youth with ASD will turn 18 years old.  Nearly half of all individuals with ASD have a major coexisting condition that requires regular medical attention.  The combination of developmental disability and comorbid conditions increases dependence on the health care system during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.  Coordinated health care transition is especially important this population.  Health care transition is a purposeful, planned process that provides comprehensive, developmentally appropriate health care in a coordinated and uninterrupted manner.  Health care transition supports youth in acquiring independent health care skills, preparing for an adult model of care, and transferring to new providers without gaps in care.  While transition planning for youth with special health care needs has been identified as a national priority for nearly 20 years, fewer than 25% of youth with ASD receive full health care transition planning services. The present webinar will address the cardinal aspects of health care transition and focus on the special needs of youth with ASD. Register Online or Download Registration

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Evidence-based Practices and Treatments for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Wednesday, March 22nd - 12:10 to 1:00PM (PART 4 of 6 part series)
Given the increasing and accumulating research in the field of autism spectrum disorders, careful syntheses of best practices are needed. This lecture will present the findings from multiple meta-analyses and systematic reviews to identify effective practices. In addition, this lecture will provide a framework for using evidence-based practice to inform decision making, thus providing the audience with knowledge that can be applied to other topics. Register Online or Download Registration

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Psychopharmacology of Autism Spectrum Disorder
Wednesday, March 8th  12:10 – 1:00PM (PART 3 of 6 part series)
This presentation will discuss the target symptoms often associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that can interfere with function and quality of life. These include motor hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity; irritability (aggression, self-injurious behavior and severe tantrums); repetitive, ritualistic behavior; mood disorders; anxiety disorders; and sleep disorders; among
others. The presentation will include which medications are useful for treating these associated target symptoms and their potential side effects. 
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Self-Injury and the Pediatric Patient: Office Management Strategies
Tuesday, February 21st  12:10 – 1:00PM
Self-injury is a common and growing behavior among US youth.  This is often an indicator of serious underlying psychopathology, but it may demonstrate a more transient or benign coping strategy.  Pediatric primary care physicians are often the first professionals to identify the behavior, mostly based on cuts or scars found on physical exam.  Self-injury may also be a reason that schools refer students for a consultation with their pediatrician.  Pediatric practitioners require the skills for basic safety assessment, triage and on-the-spot management of these maladaptive behaviors in youth. Register Online or Download Registration

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Genetics & Autism Spectrum Disorder: What PCPs Need to Know 
Wednesday, January 11th - 12:10 to 1:00PM (PART 2 of 6 part series)
Recent advances in human genetics have fostered studies of autism spectrum disorder with improved resolution, reliability, and cost effectiveness. These genetic studies have illuminated the genetic architecture underlying autism spectrum disorder and are an invaluable boon to the scientific research community. This talk will review these advances, with a particular emphasis on the role of the community practitioner in communicating the importance of genetic testing and the relevance of particular genetic variants to patients and families. Understanding the implications of recent genetic studies, the current methods for detecting these variants in patients, and the possible benefits (and caveats) of genetic testing of patients and families is an integral part of treating individuals on the autism spectrum. Register Online or Download Registration

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